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APMG Featured at 2014 USCAP National Meeting


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APMG was represented at the internationally-acclaimed United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology (USCAP) 2014 Meeting in San Diego, CA. In conjunction with The University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC), APMG presented two posters covering the feasibility of select open source quick texts/templates and non-medical voice-transcription services in pathology practices. Such investigations represent APMG’s ongoing commitment to continually investigate and harness pathology informatics solutions in real-world practice scenarios. Additional information on USCAP 2014 can be found here.


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APMG Pathologist Galen Cortina Named President of Gastrointestinal Pathology Society

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Galen Cortina, MD, APMG pathologist at Hollywood Presbyterian Memorial Medical Center, was named President Elect of the prestigious Rodger C. Haggitt GI Pathology Society. The announcement was made at this year's USCAP meeting in San Diego. The group is the leading medical society for gastrointestinal pathology.



Kelli Chase, MD, MBA, is Program Moderator at the 2014 National Meeting of the American Pathology Foundation

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Dr. Kelli Chase, APMG board member, lead the educational program and panel discussion at the American Pathology Foundation's Annual meeting in Las Vegas on March 29th. Dr. Chase is also a member of the APF program committee. More details on the 2014 APF meeting are located here.



How taking an image leads to only half the picture: Practical Informatics for Cytopathology Co-author Milon Amin Explains

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APMG member and pathologist Milon Amin teams up with Liron Pantanowitz, President of the Association for Pathology Informatics (API) to explain processes that can make (or decimate) a photomicrograph in the recently released textbook Practical Informatics for Cytopathology (2014). From post-processing techniques for print to image optimization for PowerPoint, they address common scenarios and address the all-too-common question of why my image doesn’t look the same as it does under the microscope -- and bust a number of myths about the photomicrograph acquisition and editing processes. View a preview of the book here.